Network

Are you Wi-Fied yet ?

Posted on January 7, 2012. Filed under: Gadgets, Modem, Network, Networking, Networking Gadgets, Router, WiFi, Wireleass Network | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , |


Asus RT-N13U Rev.B1

If you’re on a tight budget but still want a feature-rich router, then nothing beats the RT-N13U from Asus. The new revision B1 model comes with double the memory and RAM, so one can install bigger custom firmware packages. The router has a built-in antenna. Yet, it has a very good range, and supports a single USB 2.0 port and a WPS button to quickly pair with any device. The router also supports printer server and DD-WRT for adding more functions like Torrent downloading, NAS and SAMBA features.


TP-Link TL-WR1043ND

Here’s a budget-friendly single-band router from an up-and-coming TP-Link. If you suspect that the relatively low price could mean the device may be short of features, think again. This surprise packet, well, packs in quite a few decent features. For starters, it features Gigabit Ethernet ports for WAN and LAN. As if that is not enough, there is a USB 2.0 port as well. That is not all. Its three antennae more than make up for the absence of a dual-band feature.The said antennae dish out a very good range. Anything more? Oh yes. The TP-Link TL-WR1043ND delivers some of the fastest transfer speeds. Take a peek at the ‘specsheet’ alongside. You will probably agree this router is truly ‘value for money’.


Asus RT-N16

One of the all-time greats, it offers great features and performance without emptying your budget. A single-band router, yes, but it features three adjustable antennae. You can direct the wireless signal at multiple points — convenient in big houses. The 802.11 security up to WPA2-enterprise level makes it very secure for both home and office use.Asus integrates EZQ-OS into the firmware that automatically manages the bandwidth based on the priority you choose. What’s more, the router also sports two USB 2.0 ports, so you can just plug in a hard drive and share it as a media server. Or, you can download Torrent content directly onto the drive. Strong support from the open source community has made this device a legend in its own lifetime. Large internal memory and fast CPU enable third-party firmware like DD-WRT, Tomato USB or Oleg, enhancing its stability. Swell.


Netgear WNDR3800 N600

The N600 from Netgear is another powerful Wi-Fi ‘n’ router with good performance and features to boot. This one’s also a dual-band router but it has ‘Ready NAS Cloud’ feature that enables you to access data stored on your portable drive through the Internet (read from anywhere in the world). The design is simple and thanks to its vertical design, it will fit into narrow spaces as well. It can simultaneously broadcast Wi-Fi and signals on both 2.4GHz and 5GHz bands.You can even stream data to any DLNA compatible device like a PS3 or Xbox 360. Parental controls also help you to monitor and restrict the type of sites your child visits.


Linksys E4200Cisco’s Linksys E4200 is a near-perfect blend of style and performance. The minimalistic sting-ray design will complement the art decor in your house perfectly, but it’s not all show and no go. The E4200 is a dual-band router which means it can work on the 2.4GHz band as well as the 5GHz band. This will allow you to send multiple streams of data to different devices without any compromise in speed. It also sports a USB port which supports NAS functions and the built-in UPnP media server lets you stream video and music to a compatible device. A ‘Guest Access’ feature lets you to set up a special account for guest users so they don’t interfere with your data.


Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

High speed advocates push to deploy more fiber in San Francisco

Posted on December 28, 2011. Filed under: fiber optic, Network |

While many parts of the United States are still playing catch-up when it comes to high-speed internet, two outspoken advocates for the cause are doing what they can to deploy more fiber in San Francisco.

Dana Sniezko, a nonprofit Web developer and technology activist who started the informative site SFFiber.info; and Alex Menendez, co-founder of MonkeyBrains, are lobbying San Francisco officials to make it easier for regular companies to lay fiber and/or install their own ultra-fast cables throughout the city.

Sniezko and Menendez want to loosen the grip on local Internet service that AT&T and Comcast currently have while leapfrogging from the older DSL and cable TV technology to fiber to the home.

The pair face considerable challenges to deploying FTTH, including a maze of regulations, the big providers’ infrastructure and rights of way, and the lack of established policies for approving new approaches.

According to Sniezko, “What we have now in most parts of the United States is copper, and some of these lines are 100 years old. Copper lines were designed to carry the human voice, and all these DSL things that we’ve done are a hack. Then cable came along, which is a little better, but there are physical limitations.

With fiber, it’s the solution for the next 100 years. It can give us almost unlimited bandwidth, 100 to 1,000 times what you’d see today at a comparable price point. There’s no way San Francisco shouldn’t have something like this; we have the density and there’s a lot of demand here.”

FTTH networks can deliver download speeds of up to 1,000 megabits per second, fast enough to download about 100 digital photos in a second. That compares with average rates in San Francisco’s primarily residential ZIP codes of roughly 3 to 10 Mbps, according to a study year by the Communications Workers of America.

A February report in the SF Examiner hinted that Google was negotiating with the city on an FTTH project.

James Kelly, project manager on Google’s infrastructure team, said that Google is looking to “find the right community partners” and has issued a request for information. City officials can provide information if it is interested in becoming a partner with Google.

Google has “plans to build and test ultra-high-speed broadband networks in the United States,” Kelly said in the announcement.

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

Optical connections set to rise in Israel

Posted on December 28, 2011. Filed under: fiber optic, Network |

Israel is a prime location for fiber to the x (FTTx) expansion, as the nation is positioned well for exponential growth in fiber optic deployment to both homes and businesses.

According to a recent Ovum report, Israel hosts a number of the world’s most prolific telecoms in terms of deploying fiber optic networks around the word. However, the country boasts just one percent penetration domestically. This opportunity combines with government initiatives to improve communications infrastructure and put the nation in an excellent position to expand its optical infrastructure through FTTx deployments.

Israel’s population distribution also contributes to its potential as a destination for large-scale FTTx growth. The report explained approximately 90 percent of the nation’s population currently resides in urban regions. This means it will be easier to reach a large percentage of the population with optical technology than it would be if the population was spread out over vast tracts of rural land.

Beyond population, the report points to Israel’s healthy gross domestic product per capita and widespread access to DSL and cable internet as signs that the country may be ready for optical networks. GDP indicates a stable economy with enough household income to support FTTH, while success with DSL and cable internet means the population is familiar with fixed broadband and may be amenable to an upgrade, according to the report.

In some cases, these advantages may not benefit a country because optical networks can be too expensive to build. The report said Israel may be able to overcome that concern.

“Even with these positives, FTTx networks are expensive to build. But Israel has an advantage here too: the majority of existing electricity and communications cabling infrastructure in the country is aerial, so there is no need for costly and disruptive trenching,” according to the Ovum report.

When looking at the potential for FTTx adoption over larger regions than individual nations, another Ovum study identified the Asia and Pacific region as the leading area for FTTx expansion. The study found the region is being led by China into a role as one of the leading FTTx centers of the world. While China’s current deployment level for optical networks represents a low percentage of the population, Ovum found the actual number of subscribers is still quite large. Overall, China’s substantial population and economic growth throughout the Asia and Pacific sector should fuel rapid FTTx deployment.

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

China may account for half of the world´s fiber users by 2016

Posted on December 28, 2011. Filed under: fiber optic, Network, Technology |

According to a report from industry analyst Ovum, the fiber broadband market will be dominated by China by the year 2016. Most of this growth can be attributed to the sheer size of the Chinese population.

Ovum principal analyst and co-author of the report Julie Kunstler says that, “China is the biggest consumer of FTTx equipment right now and that is set to continue. A key driver of the enormous forecasted growth is the bandwidth and subscriber targets set by the Chinese government and service providers. In addition, the government is providing support for deployments in the form of credit and partnerships. Meanwhile, the significant greenfield construction projects that are under way in the country make the installation of FTTx networks easier.”

China’s fiber to the home penetration is currently very low at just four percent, but this number is still very close to Japan’s year-end 2010 figure at nearly 20 million. By the end of the first quarter of 2011 this number had already grown to over 22 million, according to Informa World Broadband Information Service statistics.

China’s leading native vendor is growing rapidly but continues to face opposition around the world. Politics seems to be playing a large role in the Chinese fiber business. Earlier this year, the company’s U.S. executive Ken Hu wrote an open letter denying that the company had any links to the Chinese military, while more recently it has faced a ban in Taiwan, as it got caught up in the dispute over the island’s sovereignty between its government and its nominal Chinese rulers.

The Chinese migration to fiber comes at a good time for the region. Another recent Ovum study regarding IPv6 found that the Asia/Pacific region currently leads the world in IPv4 to IPv6 transition. There are a variety of reasons for this rapid growth in the region.

The Asia Pacific is the top growth region in the world, manufactures many electronic devices and many companies see this as their key expanding region. Also, many multinational enterprises are growing their businesses in the region, which will influence the faster pace of IPv6 adoption globally. Finally, a sense of urgency in the Asia Pacific region has been prompted by the announcement by the Asia Pacific Network Information Centre that the free pool of IPv4 addresses has been effectively exhausted.

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( 1 so far )

India is preparing to deploy a fiber network across the entire country

Posted on December 28, 2011. Filed under: fiber optic, Network | Tags: , , , , |

In a recent statement, Shri Kapil Sibal, India’s minister of communication and information technology announced that the Telecom Commission wants to build a network across India called the National Optical Fiber Network. This network will extend India’s existing fiber optic network from the district level to the village level, or gram panchayat level.

According to Sibel, “the proposed NOFN will enable effective and faster implementation of various mission mode e-governance projects amounting to approx 500 billion Indian rupee (US$11.25 billion) initiated by Department of Information Technology as well as delivery of a whole range of electronic services in the above areas by the private sector to citizen in rural areas.”

In April, the Indian government announced that, in addition to growing wired networks, India plans to support mobile broadband technology in the nation. India plans to grow to 160 million broadband connections in the next three years.
The first phase of the fiber program is estimated to cost 200 billion Indian rupee (U.S.$4.5 billion). This phase will be bankrolled by the Universal Service Obligation Fund. The private sector will probably contribute similar investments in order to improve the Indian infrastructure and to provide services to the Indian people, said Sibal.

Sibal said that that the fiber optic network will grow the Indian economy by providing jobs. In addition to business benefits, Sibal said that the new fiber network will help drive Indian government programs like e-health, e-banking, e-education and more.
India is not the only nation in the eastern hemisphere with large fiber ambitions. According to an Ovum report, the fiber optic broadband market could be dominated by the Chinese by the year 2016. Most of this growth can be attributed to the enormous size of the Chinese population.

According to Ovum principal analyst and co-author of the report Julie Kunstler, “China is the biggest consumer of FTTx equipment right now and that is set to continue. A key driver of the enormous forecasted growth is the bandwidth and subscriber targets set by the Chinese government and service providers. In addition, the government is providing support for deployments in the form of credit and partnerships. Meanwhile, the significant greenfield construction projects that are under way in the country make the installation of FTTx networks easier.”

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( 2 so far )

Liked it here?
Why not try sites on the blogroll...